The Math Problem

WHY MATH?
Double
COLLEGE GRADUATION

Students who fail Algebra I are four times more likely to not finish high school. Those who take at least Algebra II in high school are twice as likely to complete a four-year degree.

$75 trillion
GDP GROWTH

Increasing the percentage of students proficient in mathematics to levels in Korea would boost the annual U.S. GDP growth rate by 1.3 percentage points, or about $75 trillion over the next 80 years, says a Harvard study.

17%
JOB GROWTH

The number of STEM field jobs in the U.S. is expected to grow by 17 percent through 2018 – compared to 10 percent growth for the economy as a whole.

“Proficiency in mathematics is a strong predictor of positive outcomes for young adults, influencing their ability to participate in post-secondary education and their expected future earnings.”
– PISA 2012 Results in Focus report
 
WHERE THE U.S.
STRUGGLES

A 2005 study shows that a scattered mathematics curriculum fails to build knowledge, causing students to fall behind their international counterparts.

One in four U.S. students did not achieve the PISA baseline Level 2 of mathematics proficiency —  the basic math skills needed in everyday life.

More than 50 percent of graduating high school seniors in 2011 were not ready for college-level math according to their ACT scores.

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